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    GMO food/feed testing is based on some fundamental principles of genetic engineering and cellular physiology: DNA: The introduction of foreign DNA into a recipient plant’s DNA (genetic engineering) Protein: The information coded in DNA is translated into protein that performs the function specified by the DNA instructions (cellular physiology) Two methods have been developed based on these fundamentals: genetic analysis (DNA analysis) and Immunological analysis (Protein analysis). Three tests are currently available using these methods.


    GWe offer a full complement of purity testing services based on both AOSA and ISTA seed testing rules.
    AOSA Purity Test This test determines the percentage by weight of pure seed, other crop seeds, inert matter, and weed seeds in a test sample. This test can be conducted on commercial, certified, official, and other samples. When a customer orders an AOSA purity test, the lab also conducts and reports an all-states noxious weed exam.


    GWe offer a full complement of purity testing services based on both AOSA and ISTA seed testing rules.
    AOSA Purity Test This test determines the percentage by weight of pure seed, other crop seeds, inert matter, and weed seeds in a test sample. This test can be conducted on commercial, certified, official, and other samples. When a customer orders an AOSA purity test, the lab also conducts and reports an all-states noxious weed exam.


    we also analyse how is DNA evidence prepared and analyzed in a crime case? Students perform agarose gel electrophoresis to analyze DNA samples from a mock crime scene. Based on DNA fingerprinting profiles that are simulated to represent the three suspects, and DNA from the crime scene, students determine which suspect likely committed the crime. This activity helps students understand how DNA variation in individuals can be analyzed in practical applications such as genetic testing and forensics. [120 minutes—One block period + part of one normal period]


    A combination of high-resolution two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, highly sensitive biological mass spectrometry, and the rapidly growing protein and DNA databases has paved the way for high-throughput proteomics. This review concentrates on protein identification. We first discuss the use of protein electroblotting and Edman sequencing as tools for de novo sequencing and protein identification.
    In the second part, we highlight matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as one of the main contemporary analytical methods for linking gel-separated proteins to entries in sequence databases. In this context we describe the two main MALDI-MS-based identification methods: (i) peptide mass fingerprinting, and (ii) post-source decay (PSD) analysis. In the last part, we briefly emphasize the importance of sample preparation for obtaining highly sensitive and high-quality MALDI-MS spectra.